ADVENT 2014: Reflection for the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception of Mary, December 8

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by Judy Coode

Genesis 3:9-15, 20 | Ephesians 1:3-6, 11-12 | Luke 1:26-38

God chose us in Christ before the world began, to be holy and blameless in God’s sight, to be full of love. (Ephesians 1:4)

One of the very few infallible Church teachings, the Immaculate Conception of Mary celebrates a woman who said “yes” when God called. Mary and her son Jesus, with their acceptance of God’s will, reversed the “no” expressed by Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. Despite her lack of education, her lack of social standing, the serious jeopardy in which her pregnancy would place her, Mary gave her trust to her Creator and chose life over fear. During this quiet time of Advent, in the darkness, we consider this profound act of faith that led to this very season.

Close your eyes and reflect on a time when you were called. What did you answer?

How has that made a difference in your life?

*This reflection originally appeared in Pax Christi USA’s Advent reflection booklet, The Presence of God: Reflections for Advent 2010.

4 responses to “ADVENT 2014: Reflection for the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception of Mary, December 8

  1. Maybe, I am misunderstanding this post, but The Immaculate Conception celebrates Mary’s conception in her mother’s womb free from original sin; not her saying “yes” to God. That is the Annunciation.

  2. That is not what the Immaculate Conception is about. A common misconception is that today celebrates the conception of Jesus. This is not true, today celebrates the conception of Mary.

  3. Thanks for your reflection on the gospel for today’s feast of the Immaculate Conception of Mary. May Jesus and Mary give us the courage to answer God’s call to confront war and the many forms of violence.

  4. Hi — thanks for the reflection — however the feast is about the conception of Mary — free from “original” sin — full of grace — not the conception of Jesus. The Gospel for the feast adds to the confusion — but there is no gospel reading about the conception of Mary.